Free sexchat without credit card - Dating old ink bottles

Great example of a very rare tonic bottle that I've seen a couple examples sell for 0 or more in recent years. KURNITZKI'S / AROMATIC / WIRE GRASS TONIC - Is that a great name or what!?

These are quite rare bottles of which I've seen maybe 6 or 7 of; here is an extra one I've come into possession of recently. Kurnitzki was a doctor (or at least used the doctor's title) who produced several different patent medicines - including a Wire Grass Kidney & Liver Medicine - in the southern city of Charleston, South Carolina (the K&L medicine notes the city; the tonic bottle does not have the city embossed).

Unlike the Mc Lean's product, this bottle has the noted embossing spread over both sides of the body..again to the delight of collectors.

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The number (within a triangle with rounded corners) found on the bottom of plastic bottles is a code indicating the type of plastic the bottle is made of, and pertains to the subject of recycling) .

Always look very closely over the entire glass bottle or other container to make sure there is not some type of logo (emblem, trademark, initials, or just a letter) that might indicate the actual glass manufacturer.

If a number of identical bottle molds are being used simultaneously, each mold would be assigned a number.

(If problems occur with the finished product, it can be easily ascertained which mold or mold section is at fault.) Numbers also serve other purposes, depending on the exact container and/or company being discussed. Some numbers (for instance, 3- or 4-digit numbers on the base of many British bottles) are catalog, inventory, style or design numbers assigned to a particular bottle shape.

Many whiskey bottles are seen with “D-numbers” on the bottom which are distillery identification codes.

Date codes are often seen, especially on soda bottles from the 1930s to date, and many of these codes are embossed on the base of the bottle, placed to the right of the glassmaker’s logo. These date codes are not always obvious, or easy to distinguish from mold numbers.

It has the deep blue aqua color typical of the 1870s and 1880s products blown at the SF&PGW (or predecessors) and have been reported to be found in the West, though some seem to come from back east also.

In any event, this example is 9.2" tall, "flask" shaped body (over 4" wide and 2" thick), blown in a post-base mold, lacking evidence of body air venting although boldly embossed, and a crudely applied double ring lip or finish with an appearance and manufacturing signature dating it to the 1870s.

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More information on this invention (which is rather involved!

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